Current Exhibition

UPcoming Exhibition

past Exhibition

In Times of Seismic Sorrows

On View

Aug

21

Jan

26

FRONT & CENTER

Front & center

When reflecting on the current state of the environment, it seems that we have entered into times of seismic sorrows. Carbon emissions, water pollution, fracking, and changing climate patterns all point to a troubling reality with serious consequences for human and non-human populations. Through weavings, installations, sculpture, and print, artists Rena Detrixhe and Tali Weinberg (Tulsa, OK) explore the complex relationship between humans and the planet, offering insights, expressing grief, and creating space for resilience and change.

SUPPORT

No items found.
No items found.

OPENING RECEPTION

,

,

ARTISTS

Tali Weinberg

Rena Detrixhe

CURATORS

Marilyn Zapf

PHOTOGRAPHY

Black Box Photography

exhibition events

exhibition Images

about the artists

Photo courtesy of the artist

Rena Detrixhe

Rena Detrixhe creates contemplative work combining repetitive process and collected or scavenged materials to produce meticulous, large-scale objects and installations. Drawn to materials which possess an inherent story or familiar source and often utilizing natural elements, a continuing objective in her practice is to investigate the relationship between humans and the more-than-human world. Recent work explores systems of value in relation to land and water and slowness as a means of cultivating empathy and understanding.

Continue reading...

Detrixhe received her BFA from the University of Kansas in 2013. She has exhibited in museums and galleries across the United States and is the recipient of numerous awards including a scholarship to attend the prestigious art school at Hongik University in Seoul, South Korea and a two-year studio residency with Charlotte Street Foundation in Kansas City, Missouri. Recent exhibitions include Ephemera at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art in Overland Park, KS, and a solo exhibition at the Philbrook Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In 2017 she received both the public vote and juried vote awards in the time-based category for her workRed Dirt Rug at ArtPrize Nine in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Detrixhe has spent the past two years as a Tulsa Artist Fellow in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Photo courtesy of the artist

Tali Weinberg

Tali Weinberg’s current research explores the mechanisms through which we come to understand climate change, from data to embodied experience. Her abstracted landscapes are comprised of data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and materialized with organic fibers dyed with plant and insect-derived dyes and mineral mordants. These weavings draw on the intimacy, sociality and science of textiles, to reveal interconnections—between multiple forms of knowledge and between corporeal and ecological bodies.

Continue reading...

Weinberg’s work is included in the collection of the Berkeley Art Museum (BAMPFA) and is exhibited in galleries and museums across North America, including Philbrook Museum of Art, the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles, the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art, and was included in the 2016 Hangzhou Triennial of Fiber Art in Zhejiang Province, China. She has taught at California College of the Arts (CCA), Penland School of Craft, the Textile Arts Center in NY, and Headlands Center for the Arts. Her research is supported by multiple grants and residencies including a Wingate Foundation-funded residency at Vermont Studio Center, a Collins Foundation-funded residency at Oregon College of Art, Craft, the Lia Cook Jacquard Weaving Residency, and is currently funded by a three-year Tulsa Artist Fellowship. Recent invited lectures include the Keynote for Fiberart International's Triennial Symposium, and a presentation  at the California Studies Association’s conference Parched: Dry Times in the Golden State in conversation with community organizers, scientists, and geographers. Weinberg holds an MFA from CCA and an MA and BA from New York University.

In Times of Seismic Sorrows

is

curated by Marilyn Zapf

and

organized

by

the

Center

for

Craft.

The

Center

for

Craft

is

supported

in

part

by

the

Since its inception in 1964, the North Carolina Arts Council has imagined and executed an innovative vision for arts development that touches every corner of our state — all 100 counties — from the mountains to the coast.

,

a

division

of

the

Department

of

Natural

and

Cultural

Resources.