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Current Exhibition

UPcoming Exhibition

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On View 

Mįhą́pmąk

Mįhą́pmąk

On view

Aug

29

Jan

28

Through

Aug

29

Jan

28

When

Aug 29, 2022

Jan 28, 2023

Person on the ground with a clay pot

Photo credit:

Photograph by Ginger Dunnill

Current Exhibition

UPcoming Exhibition

past Exhibition

On View 

Mįhą́pmąk

On view

Aug

29

Jan

28

Through

Aug

29

Jan

28

When

Aug 29, 2022

Jan 28, 2023

Person on the ground with a clay pot

Photo credit:

Photograph by Ginger Dunnill

Current Exhibition

UPcoming Exhibition

past Exhibition

On View 

Mįhą́pmąk

On view

Aug

29

Jan

28

Through

Aug

29

Jan

28

When

Aug 29, 2022

Jan 28, 2023

Person on the ground with a clay pot

Photo credit:

Photograph by Ginger Dunnill

FRONT & CENTER

Front & center

“Mįhą́pmąk”  is a solo exhibition of 2020 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellow Cannupa Hanska Luger’s ongoing work to recover and re-establish his ancestral Mandan clay traditions. The Mandan people of what is now known as North Dakota are the original inhabitants of the clay-rich lands that stretch over the Missouri River basin and across the plains. Their centuries-old clay traditions and technologies range from functional vessels to earth-built homes. Colonialism decimated Mandan populations in the 18th century and Luger’s grant-funded artistic research is an urgent response to recover this critical indigenous knowledge.

The exhibition includes ceramics, research ephemera, and documentation from the past two years of his ongoing investigation, which ​​was conducted in museum collections, in the cut banks and clay veins of the Fort Berthold Reservation, with community elders, and through the materiality of the clay itself, asserting the role of the artist-researcher in rebuilding and creating knowledge. The exhibition’s title, “Mįhą́pmąk,”  translates from  Mandan language to “nowadays (in modern times)” and “here we are.” This word is a declaration of presence and resilience.

Considering his research process, the artist notes: “After digging, processing, testing, firing, observing, destroying, pulverizing, and making with clay over two years, I have only begun to understand the complex ancestral technologies of my Mandan ancestors. Yet, a memory has been woken in my muscles — I am at the beginning — honoring the knowledge of before, the experimentation of the present, and practicing a way forward for future generations of my people. My hope is that [this research] provides reflection to possible experiences for Indigenous people of my heritage to reacquaint themselves with clay.” Luger’s research demonstrates a living continuum of Indigenous clay experience by communing with ancestral knowledge and integrating it with contemporary technologies and practices that are geared toward the future.

Cannupa Hanska Luger is the recipient of the Center for Craft’s 2020 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. Each year this substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

SUPPORT

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OPENING RECEPTION

,

,

Where

John Cram Gallery

67 Broadway St., Asheville, NC, 28801

ARTISTS

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ARTISTS

EasterN Band Cherokee Exhibiting Artists

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CURATed By

Exhibition management

Installation by

Sarah Darro

Exhibition design

Edited by

Graphic Design by

Photography by

exhibition events

The events for this exhibition have passed. See our full calendar for upcoming events.

Meet the artists

ᏚᏍᏓᏯᎫᎾᏱ Gabriel Crow

Cherokee, NC

Faye Junaluska

Cherokee, NC

Lucille Lossiah

Ramon Lose

Cullowhee, NC

ᏯᏗ ᎺᏂ Betty Maney

Cherokee, NC

ᏗᎳᏂ Dylan Morgan

Cherokee, NC

ᎺᎵ ᏔᎻᏏᏂ Mary W. Thompson

ᏎᎳᏂ ᏔᎻᏏᏂ Sarah Thompson

Patricia Welch

Field Building

Meet the artists

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Field Building

about the artists

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Cannupa Hanska Luger

Cannupa Hanska Luger is a multidisciplinary artist and an enrolled member of the Three Affiliated Tribes of Fort Berthold (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara and Lakota). Through monumental installations and social collaboration, Luger activates speculative fiction and communicates stories about 21st Century Indigeneity, combining critical cultural analysis with dedication and respect for the diverse materials, environments, and communities he engages. He lectures and produces large-scale projects around the globe and his works are in many public collections.

Continue reading...

Luger is a 2022 Guggenheim fellow, recipient of the 2021 United States Artists Fellowship Award for Craft and was named a Grist 50 Fixer for 2021, a list which includes emerging leaders in climate, sustainability, and equity who are creating change across the nation. He is a 2020 Creative Capital Fellow, a 2020 Smithsonian Artist Research Fellow, the recipient the 2020 A Blade Of Grass Artist Fellowship for Socially Engaged Art and the recipient of the Center For Craft’s inaugural Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship for 2020. He is the recipient of a 2019 Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters & Sculptors Grant, a 2019 Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Honoree, and the recipient of the Museum of Arts and Design’s 2018 inaugural Burke Prize. Luger has exhibited internationally including venues such as the Gardiner Museum, Kunsthal KAdE, Washington Project for the Arts, Art Mûr, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, among others. Luger holds a BFA in studio arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts.

exhibition Images

exhibition Images

Mįhą́pmąk

is

curated

by

and

Organized

by

the

Center

for

Craft.

The

Center

for

Craft

is

supported

in

part

by

the

,

a

division

of

the

Department

of

Natural

and

Cultural

Resources.

The Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship is generously supported by the Windgate Foundation.

This

exhibition

is

supported

in

part

by

the

the

and

For a full listing of the generous funders supporting the Center for Craft and our programming visit centerforcraft.org/support

This

exhibition

is

supported

in

part

by

the

the

and

the

a

division

of

the

Department

of

Natural

and

Cultural

Resources.

For a full listing of the generous funders supporting the Center for Craft and our programming visit centerforcraft.org/support

The

Center

for

Craft’s

John

Cram

Partner

Gallery

presented

in

collaboration

with

UNC Asheville transforms lives through leadership and education. The designated liberal arts and sciences institution for the UNC System and one of the nation’s top 10 public liberal arts universities, UNC Asheville enrolls 3,600 students and offers more than 30 undergraduate majors and a Master of Liberal Arts and Sciences degree. UNC Asheville also encourages students to take part in a nationally acclaimed undergraduate research program and participate in interdisciplinary learning. From internships and hands-on projects, to study abroad and community engagement, students experience an education that extends beyond campus into the vibrant City of Asheville, the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains and the world.

and

A liberal arts college grounded in social responsibility, where hard work and community are more than just words.

.

This

exhibition

is

supported

in

part

by

the

the

and

For a full listing of the generous funders supporting the Center for Craft and our programming visit centerforcraft.org/support

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