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UPcoming Exhibition

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On View 

Crafted Roots: Stories and Objects from the Appalachian Mountains

On view

Aug

3

Oct

23

Through

Aug

3

Oct

23

When

Aug 3, 2020

Oct 23, 2020

a black and white photo of four people sitting around a table with bookcases behind them, in conversation.

Photo credit:

Image courtesy of Southern Highland CraftGuild Archives.

FRONT & CENTER

Front & center

The foundations of the thriving craft scene found in the Appalachian region today were constructed over time. Locally made crafts were first marketed to outside urban markets in the late 1800s by missionaries who came to these mountains to teach at the numerous settlement schools in the rural communities surrounding Asheville. Crafted Roots explores a critical time in the development of the region's handcrafted identity during the late 1800s through the 1930s. 

At that time, many rural mountain people lived a subsistence life free from the pressures of the encroaching industrialized society. Audio recordings and objects convey this way of life. The voices heard are extracts from oral histories with local craftspeople and urban missionaries. 

The missionary women who came to these mountains sought to uplift local communities through the revival and marketing of traditional crafts. The marketing of Appalachian crafts included the manipulation of traditional designs so that they would appeal to the affluent urban consumers who lived in the Northern cities from where many of these missionaries had come.

While there have been many exhibitions and scholarly texts that have examined the time period represented in Crafted Roots, none have incorporated audio extracts, scenography, and objects to tell this story. Here, you are invited to sit and spend time, you are asked to de-accelerate and actively listen to the stories that are told and consider the lives of the objects on display.

Links to exhibition audio available at MACraftstudiesWWC.com


Two Ways to View

Virtual Tour

Online visitors can purchase tickets ($5) to attend a virtual tour of this exhibition with curator, Michael Hatch.

PURCHASE TICKETS >>

In-Person

The Center is offering free, unguided visits and affordable tours of its exhibitions to the public. Guests can reserve a 30-minute visit to explore the current exhibitions, learn more about the Center’s national impact in their Craft Research Fund Study Collection, and enjoy interactive activities. The Center is open to the public Tuesday-Friday, 12-6 pm. Hours of operation may be subject to change.

Center for Craft is monitoring the effects of COVID-19 on the community and following the instruction of federal, state, and local health departments. Our top priority is always the health and safety of our staff, coworkers, and visitors. At this time, the Center can only allow a maximum of five guests in its public space at once and will require the use of masks or face coverings by all visitors, including children. The Center reserves the right to refuse entry to any visitor that will not comply.

REGISTER >>

Cover Image: Oral History Interview, left to right Marian Heard, Bernice Stevens, Rude Osolnick, Georgia Wier, Folklife Documentation Project; Image courtesy of Southern Highland CraftGuild Archives.

SUPPORT

No items found.
No items found.

OPENING RECEPTION

,

,

Where

Center for Craft, John Cram Partner Gallery

67 Broadway St., Asheville NC 28801

CURATed By

Michael Hatch, MA in Critical Craft Studies '20, Warren Wilson College

Exhibition management

Installation by

Exhibition design

Edited by

Graphic Design by

Photography by

exhibition events

The events for this exhibition have passed. See our full calendar for upcoming events.

about the artists

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Frances Goodrich, personal collection

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

exhibition Images

exhibition Images

Crafted Roots: Stories and Objects from the Appalachian Mountains

is

curated

by

Michael Hatch, MA in Critical Craft Studies '20, Warren Wilson College

and

organized

by

the

Center

for

Craft.

The

Center

for

Craft

is

supported

in

part

by

the

Since its inception in 1964, the North Carolina Arts Council has imagined and executed an innovative vision for arts development that touches every corner of our state — all 100 counties — from the mountains to the coast.

,

a

division

of

the

Department

of

Natural

and

Cultural

Resources.

The

Center

for

Craft’s

John

Cram

Partner

Gallery

presented

in

collaboration

with

UNC Asheville transforms lives through leadership and education. The designated liberal arts and sciences institution for the UNC System and one of the nation’s top 10 public liberal arts universities, UNC Asheville enrolls 3,600 students and offers more than 30 undergraduate majors and a Master of Liberal Arts and Sciences degree. UNC Asheville also encourages students to take part in a nationally acclaimed undergraduate research program and participate in interdisciplinary learning. From internships and hands-on projects, to study abroad and community engagement, students experience an education that extends beyond campus into the vibrant City of Asheville, the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains and the world.

and

A liberal arts college grounded in social responsibility, where hard work and community are more than just words.

.

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23

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