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On View 

Shapeshifters: Select Works by Joshua Adams and Jiha Moon

On view

Jan

17

Mar

29

On view

Through

Jan

17

Mar

29

When

Jan 17, 2020

Mar 29, 2020

Photo credit:

FRONT & CENTER

Front & center

Shapeshifters features over forty works by Joshua Adams (Cherokee, NC) and Jiha Moon (Atlanta, GA). Included in folklore the world over, shapeshifters are beings or spirits that can physically transform into the shape of another. Similarly, masks can be used to transform the wearer, allowing the performer to become someone or something other than themselves. As a decorative and aesthetic form rooted in specific cultural heritages, the mask becomes integral for Adams’ and Moon’s exploration of personal identity.


Adams, an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians and trained woodcarver, often creates masks inspired by traditional Cherokee stories in order to educate viewers about tribal culture. Addressing his own personal experience, Adams observes the complexity of living in the multiple cultural contexts of maintaining Cherokee tradition in the contemporary South. 


Korean-born artist Moon assembles and paints her work with recognizable imagery, such as fortune cookies, dragons, and emojis juxtaposed with facets of southern culture, such as peaches, face jugs, and the southernism “bless your heart.” By playfully combining eastern and western symbols, Moon reflects on the intricacies of identity and nationhood in an increasingly global society. 


Adams’ and Moon’s works defy conventional categorization and shift misconceptions of their respective identities by skillfully combining surfaces and symbols. The mask is just one format that these artists use, yet it provides a valuable lens into understanding their broader art practice.


SUPPORT

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OPENING RECEPTION

,

,

Where

John Cram Partner Gallery

67 Broadway, Asheville NC

ARTISTS

Joshua Adams

Jiha Moon

CURATed By

Marilyn Zapf

Exhibition management

Lauren Roquemore

Installation by

Lauren Roquemore, Carrie Helmkamp, Kyle Lawson

Exhibition design

Edited by

Lola Clairmont

Graphic Design by

Futures Bright

Photography by

exhibition events

about the artists

Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Joshua Adams

Joshua Adams (born 1982) works predominantly in the medium of wood sculpture, but includes stone carvings, paintings, photography, molding, 3D printing, pottery and videography.

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Joshua Adams (born 1982) works predominantly in the medium of wood sculpture, but includes stone carvings, paintings, photography, molding, 3D printing, pottery and videography. Adams is part of a long lineage of Cherokee woodcarvers, starting with his family James “Red” and Irma Bradley. Adams also studied under renowned Cherokee artist Dr. James Bud Smith and was directly influenced by legendary Cherokee artists Amanda Crowe and John Julius Wilnoty. Adams had held the position of woodcarving instructor at Cherokee High School for nearly ten years. He is a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee and the Qualla Arts and Crafts Cooperative, and an alumni of Western Carolina University. His work has been exhibited throughout the world.

Most recently Adams’ mask, “False Faced God,” was included in the permanent collection at the Asheville Art Museum. In 2018 Adams participated and curated “Renewal of the Ancient,” a showcase of over 30 Cherokee millennial artist at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian in collaboration with the Cherokee Preservation Foundation. In 2018 Adams’ mounted a solo exhibit at Western Carolina University titled, “Facing Culture.” Adams’ work was selected for inclusion in the fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival at the Nation Museum of the American Indian.  In 2016 Adams received a 1st place ribbon in the Sculpture division at the SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market. Adams  also received two awards at the 2016 Cherokee Art Market, including the Culture Keeper Award and Best of Class in the Sculpture Division. Previously, he placed 1st at the 2015 SWAIA Indian Market in Diverse Arts and was also awarded two first place ribbons at the 2015 Cherokee Indian Fair for his entries in painting and traditional masks. His work was also chosen for the Art in Embassies project and is currently on display at the Tanzanian Embassy.


Photo credit: Jamie Hopper

Jiha Moon

Jiha Moon (born 1973) is from DaeGu, Korea and lives and works in Atlanta, GA. She received her MFA from the University of Iowa, Iowa City.

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Jiha Moon (born 1973) is from DaeGu, Korea and lives and works in Atlanta, GA. She received her MFA from the University of Iowa, Iowa City. Her works have been acquired by Asia Society, New York, NY, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA, The Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC, Smithsonian Institute, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, Weatherspoon Museum of Art, Greensboro, NC and The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA. She has had solo exhibitions at Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, GA, Taubman Museum, Roanoke, VA, the Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC, The Cheekwood Museum of Art, Nashville, TN and Rhodes College, Clough-Hanson Gallery, Memphis, TN and James Gallery of CUNY Graduate Center, New York, NY. She has been included in group shows at Kemper Museum, Kansas City, MO, the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, PA, the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, GA, Asia Society, New York, NY, The Drawing Center, New York, NY, White Columns, New York, NY, Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA, and the Weatherspoon Museum of Art, Greensboro, NC. She is recipient of prestigious Joan Mitchell foundation’s painter and sculptor’s award for 2011. Her mid-career survey exhibition, "Double Welcome: Most Everyone’s Mad" Here organized by Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and Taubman Museum has toured more than 10 museum venues around the country until 2018.

exhibition Images

exhibition Images

Shapeshifters: Select Works by Joshua Adams and Jiha Moon

is

curated by Marilyn Zapf

and

organized

by

the

Center

for

Craft.

The

Center

for

Craft

is

supported

in

part

by

the

Since its inception in 1964, the North Carolina Arts Council has imagined and executed an innovative vision for arts development that touches every corner of our state — all 100 counties — from the mountains to the coast.

,

a

division

of

the

Department

of

Natural

and

Cultural

Resources.

The

Center

for

Craft’s

John

Cram

Partner

Gallery

presented

in

collaboration

with

UNC Asheville transforms lives through leadership and education. The designated liberal arts and sciences institution for the UNC System and one of the nation’s top 10 public liberal arts universities, UNC Asheville enrolls 3,600 students and offers more than 30 undergraduate majors and a Master of Liberal Arts and Sciences degree. UNC Asheville also encourages students to take part in a nationally acclaimed undergraduate research program and participate in interdisciplinary learning. From internships and hands-on projects, to study abroad and community engagement, students experience an education that extends beyond campus into the vibrant City of Asheville, the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains and the world.

and

A liberal arts college grounded in social responsibility, where hard work and community are more than just words.

.

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